Child Support

Orlando Child Support Attorneys

In child support cases, both parents have the responsibility to support the children that they have in common. Here in the State of Florida, the party’s child support obligation usually ends when the child reaches the age of majority (18 years old), marries, or becomes financially independent. There are circumstances in which the obligation of child support may continue past the age of eighteen for the child.  Consult with an experienced Orlando attorneys at Longwell Lawyers so we can explain to you whether or not this may apply in your matter.

The amount of child support obligation that each party is responsible for is calculated based upon the Florida Child Support Guidelines Worksheet. In order to calculate each parties share of their respective child support obligation, the following information is considered (a) the net income of each of the parties; (b) any childcare expenses; (c) medical insurance coverage provided for the children; and (d) any adjustments for any substantial overnight contact.

Other factors that are involved in child support are (a) who claims the dependency deduction for tax purposes; (b) the method of payment (i.e., direct payment, income deduction order.); and (c) the amount of support. There is some flexibility that is allowed for a deviation in the child support obligation amount; however, any deviation requires an explanation to the Court in the Order as to the reasons for the deviation.

One of the most important issues to remember in reference to child support is as follows- if you are not receiving child support from the other parent, it does not necessarily give you the right to withhold visitation. Just as well, if you are not able to exercise visitation with the child because of the interference of the other parent, it does not give you the right to withhold child support. These actions are not legal, and require the reprimand of the Court.

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